Dallas Cop Slaughter:
Words Became Bullets

by Scott Ott

If you want to kill Black people there are easier ways than becoming a cop – much easier.

The easiest of all, statistically speaking, is to just be a Black person who lives near, or with, other Black people. That’s how the majority of the annual Black body count happens. Of course, if you were born non-Black, that avenue may be closed to you (barring rapid advances in racial-reassignment therapy.)

The next easiest way to kill Black people is to accept and believe the teachings of Mohammed. Find yourself a literalist Imam who preaches the Koran as it is, and stoke your murderous passion via the wide variety of jihadi fomentation and instruction sites on the Internet. The majority of perforated, shattered and shredded bodies from Muslim terror attacks each year are brown and black. If the rigors of the Five Pillars of Islam require more discipline than you’re willing to exert — no matter. Most of Mohammed’s bloody devotees live a double life anyway, cursing the infidel while sharing his passions. The road to Muslim martyrdom is often paved with intoxicants, sex and pornography.

These are the relatively-easy ways to kill Black people.

[To hear audio podcast of this essay, scroll down and press Play button.]

However, becoming a police officer to satisfy your gory bigotry is ridiculously difficult. It requires years of preparation, training and schooling – all the time surrounded by the most decent, devoted protectors of human life and civil society among us. Should you manage to run that gauntlet, and earn a badge, you’ll then be subjected to rigorous oversight and endless second-guessing by activists, politicians and internal affairs, not to mention your own supervisors, partners and colleagues. As you follow this path, hoping to “kill you some Black people,” you’ll have to daily place yourself in the line of fire – approaching armed suspects and obvious criminals who can easily “get the drop” on you. In some neighborhoods you’ll patrol, a fair portion of the populace will view you as an existential threat to their lives and their illicit businesses. You’ll have to live every day in fear for your own life, sometimes longing to hear the sound of your house key in the lock at the end of the day, and knowing that even then you’re a target.

Would you endure all of this to get a chance to bag a Black person under circumstances that would allow you to be exonerated by a review board, a district attorney, a grand jury, a judge and perhaps jury of your peers?

“But, but, but,” says the activist or politician, “they usually are exonerated. Black people die at the hands of police, and police don’t go to jail.”

Well, that could mean one of two things:

  1. The system is corrupt, with cops, prosecutors, citizen witnesses, judges and juries all protecting murderers, or
  2. The vast majority of police gunfire is triggered in circumstances that warrant deadly force.

I’m not suggesting all cops are virtuous. No, they’re human. They make mistakes, like you and I do. They sometimes do wrong things, and have biases…like you and I do. The consequences of their mistakes or lack of self-control can be deadly. They should come under enhanced scrutiny because of their weighty responsibility to a society that proclaims equal justice under law.

But it is beyond absurd for activists and politicians to characterize cops as racially-motivated killers on the hunt. Loose words of condemnation from the president, or a mayor, a journalist, or a celebrity, stoke the flames of rage in unstable minds.

Last night in Dallas, snipers from lofty perches triangulated police officers who were providing protection to participants in a rally against police violence. (Notice, the cops guarded your right to protest their actions.) In the withering fusillade that followed, 11 officers fell, at least five mortally wounded. According to the Dallas police chief, during negotiations with a suspect who ultimately died, the shooter said he wanted to kill White people because of police shootings of Black people.

President Obama spoke words of grief, comfort, and praise for the police…but too late. He, and his fellow travelers on the Left have spent years now questioning the judgment of the cop on the street, stoking racial fears – making our urban neighborhoods more dangerous for police and civilians alike – playing into the hands criminals who increasingly run our cities like brutal fiefdoms in the midst of tribal wars.

Five police funerals.

Five grieving congregations of friends and family.

Six wounded guardians of the peace who will repeatedly replay those moments when Hell rained from above.

But perhaps worse than that: In Dallas last night, words became bullets that felled the rule of law.

Play

Scott Ott Show, Ep. 6

Originally streamed LIVE on YouTube,  November 19, 2015.

Topics…

  • The aftermath of the Paris attacks, and specifically the media approach to reporting the story.
  • The downing of a university president by race-activists.
  • The best books for conservatives to read

Plus a lot of hyperactive interaction with folks in the LIVE chatroom.